Tag: history

Hekla’s Children: Book Review

A little bit different to my usual choice – a kind of Horror Sci-fi. Caught sight of this one when looking through Indie Presses and what was coming out. So glad I read this one – thoroughly immersive, well-written and blood-curdling. 

 

Descent

The story tells the tale of a teacher, Nathan Brookes who takes a group of teenagers on an orienteering field trip. However he is neglectful, and the children go missing. Only one is found and has suffered memory loss and fails to enlighten everyone of what happened to the others.We see how Nathan stagnates in his life due to the guilt he feels from that day onwards. When a body is unearthed in the same woods where the children went missing, it is at first believed to be one of their bodies. However, the body turns out to be the body of a Bronze Age mummy, preserved by the peat of the area, as with such other bog bodies discovered as Tollund Man.

Depth

We see how Nathan stagnates in his life due to the guilt he feels from that day onwards. When a body is unearthed in the same woods where the children went missing, it is at first believed to be one of the children’s bodies. However, this is where things diverge into fantastical realms and the real story begins. This is a fascinating book with elements of folklore and superstitions from the Dark Ages of Britain. I loved the anthropological nature of the story in the present with the character, Tara who delves into researching the Bronze Age mummy and how the logical line of inquiry by the police is swept away by her discoveries. Little by little, the past intrudes into the present in astounding and horrifying ways.

Ascent

I really didn’t see the twist coming in this and devoured the last section of it. The ending will haunt you long after you finish!

The Thirteenth Tale: Book Review

A gem of a book. Loved it…a story that echoes other stories, reminding you of the books you love and making you want to visit them once again.

Descent

This was a wonderful bookish book. The MC, Margaret has been raised in a bookshop and spends her day working and reading there, having become something of an “amateur” biographer as she terms it. Books have been her school, her university, her life. Like I say it was just ooooh so bookish.

“…you leave the previous book with ideas and themes  - characters even - caught in the fibres of your clothes, and when you open the new book they are still with you.”

Depth

The storyline follows the biographer’s trip to interview Vida Winters, a prolific, famous and secretive author. The author has never given a truthful account of her life…until now. Margaret journeys to her house in Yorkshire, and you cannot help think (as the MC does) of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Through Miss Winter’s story we discover her tale (and there is a house) Angelfield House involved in the tale. But we are taken down the twists and turns of history, of literature, history echoing story or story echoing history, hungering to discover Miss Winter’s true tale, which, in turn, shares painful similarities with Margaret’s own.

Ascent

I devoured this in two sittings, and I didn’t want to come out of it. It felt like a homage  to other wonderful books as well. Just after reading it, I delved into Wuthering Heights again and I’m going to see Jane Eyre shortly at the theatre. So all in all, this is a book that you can luxuriate in and after leaving gets you in the mood to jump into lots of other stories that have inspired it. Also bought a copy of Rebecca recently on holiday, which has a lot to do with the ideas from this book still percolating in my head!

(The library in Dunster Castle, Somerset.)

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