Tag: bookreview

The Thirteenth Tale: Book Review

A gem of a book. Loved it…a story that echoes other stories, reminding you of the books you love and making you want to visit them once again.

Descent

This was a wonderful bookish book. The MC, Margaret has been raised in a bookshop and spends her day working and reading there, having become something of an “amateur” biographer as she terms it. Books have been her school, her university, her life. Like I say it was just ooooh so bookish.

“…you leave the previous book with ideas and themes  - characters even - caught in the fibres of your clothes, and when you open the new book they are still with you.”

Depth

The storyline follows the biographer’s trip to interview Vida Winters, a prolific, famous and secretive author. The author has never given a truthful account of her life…until now. Margaret journeys to her house in Yorkshire, and you cannot help think (as the MC does) of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Through Miss Winter’s story we discover her tale (and there is a house) Angelfield House involved in the tale. But we are taken down the twists and turns of history, of literature, history echoing story or story echoing history, hungering to discover Miss Winter’s true tale, which, in turn, shares painful similarities with Margaret’s own.

Ascent

I devoured this in two sittings, and I didn’t want to come out of it. It felt like a homage  to other wonderful books as well. Just after reading it, I delved into Wuthering Heights again and I’m going to see Jane Eyre shortly at the theatre. So all in all, this is a book that you can luxuriate in and after leaving gets you in the mood to jump into lots of other stories that have inspired it. Also bought a copy of Rebecca recently on holiday, which has a lot to do with the ideas from this book still percolating in my head!

(The library in Dunster Castle, Somerset.)

Wolf of the Tesseract

 

My leanings tend to be more Fantasy than Sci-fi, and Wolf of the Tesseract by Christopher D. Schmitz is firmly entrenched in the Sci-Fi camp. It has intergalactic travel, the characters have multiple-selves throughout the dimensions and the MCs’ nemesis is an alien warlock. That said, I’m thoroughly pleased I have broadened my reading range!

The story starts off with a fast-paced battle scene, with an introduction to one of the MCs, Zabe. I was really drawn into the world with the pace and vividness with which it was described – the writing is concise but descriptive.

The next chapter transports us from this world to Earth. The pace might be in danger of languishing here after the high-action scene, but I was instantly intrigued by what occurred and the plot thickens.

By chapter three, we meet the other MC, Claire and the book becomes firmly rooted in the real world too. The way the story swings between Earth and the other realm was brilliant. I think without the foundation in the real world, I would have struggled to be drawn into the story as much, but the balance is done perfectly.

Not to mention that the multiple dimensions also serve for some wonderfully comic moments. Some of the best quotes come from the play between the two worlds. One of my favourite lines was: “What’s in Wiltshire?” “Our exit to another world.”

In the book there is a vast array of characters and yet the story never becomes confusing, and even more impressively, all the characters are fleshed-out. Even the secondary character’s, for example Claire’s friend, Jackie are well- drawn and ended up being some of my favourites.

I was surprised that with so many characters, the quick pace and the narration being from multiple viewpoints that the story still possessed real depth. Early on, the MC Claire grapples with whether her feelings for her fiance are strong enough to marry him, there is a discussion between the characters about whether unexplained phenomena isn’t just Science that we don’t yet understand. In short, the world and characters are made real and the extraordinary only serves to enhance it.

A wonderful read – I will definitely be reading more by the author.

 

Image from https://pixabay.com/en/users/TheHilaryClark-1068778/

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